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Preakness Poltroons | Superfectablog v3.0

Racehorses in History

June: Fairy Chant
b. 1937
Why: A champion at 3 and 4, Fairy Chant won the Beldame twice. She was in the money for 26 of her 42 races.

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Preakness Poltroons

It seems to be all sorted out now (thanks to Marylou Whitney), but the fact that so many wealthy owners seriously considered entering their stable leftovers (completely disregarding the welfare of those horses, who have already demonstrated they aren’t up to taking on this kind of field) to keep Rachel Alexandra out of the Preakness speaks volumes about some of those involved in our sport at the highest level.

Sure, Jess Jackson flew in with his checkbook to get his Preakness horse – I understand how irksome that must seem. But given the aforementioned owners, it’s not as though they don’t have equally deep pockets; no one was stopping them from trying to make a better offer. They had every opportunity to try to buy Rachel Alexandra after she ran a full second faster than Friesan Fire did on Louisiana Derby day and again after the Oaks – but they missed the boat.

I’ve never had a compelling reason to go to the Preakness and plenty of excuses to avoid it (not the least being the abysmal state of the physical plant at Pimlico and a general abhorrence of frat boys) – but if the filly is officially in, consider me Baltimore-bound.

Few things get uglier than a childish spat among the ultra-wealthy. Next time, try taking it outside in Gstaad après-ski – please keep your egos out of my racing.

5 comments to Preakness Poltroons

  • Jessica

    It really was an ugly little scene that could have diminished what is shaping up as an interesting race. Although I’d prefer Jackson wait until the Belmont to start Rachel Alexandra next, it would have been very annoying if that became the plan only because of a churlish plan concocted by Allan and Zayat.

  • Bob

    Since Zayat’s scheme didn’t pan out maybe he should consider changing the jockey on PoTN. Angel Cordero would be a good fit. Can handle the whip and has experience in making sure a filly doesn’t make The Preakness winner’s circle.

  • Jonathan

    Bob – that’s a funny comment….also, if Talamo was riding Cordero could be counted on to use his whip on an opposing young rider’s mount in the days before the Preakness (remember Franklin I think a few days before? I was very young but seem to remember a whip to the eye of a 2yo right out of the gate…)

  • Anonymous

    Yeah, it was funny. Zayat sounded frantic on TVG explaining why he and Allen considered it. He made a fool of himself by explaining that he was both fearful for the filly (but not for the diminutive Mine that Bird) given the Eight Belles incident. Although he also qualified it by saying that he had nothing against the girls racing the boys.
    Then he claimed it was unfair because she had not had to go through the rigorous schedule that the colts were put through. He of course didn’t mention that Dunkirk had one stakes race in three total before the Derby, and oh, he’s kind of little too.
    As far as Allen goes, who knows why a guy who almost went to jail for bribery would want to stick his neck out. I imagine both of them got some interesting phone calls Sunday. Probably heard some things you wouldn’t want your Mom to hear.

  • Glenn Craven

    I don’t believe for a minute that Marylou Whitney and D. Wayne Lukas felt that Luv Gov “had a shot” in the Preakness. The horse broke his maiden in his 10th lifetime start on the Derby undercard. He has no business venturing within a half-mile of the starting gates at a Grade 1 race.

    For Marylou and company to come back later and say they’re all for Rachel and would never enter a horse that would keep her out was merely an attempt at face-saving. It seems impossible to believe they had any other motive than protecting their stallion’s son from getting beat by a girl.

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